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Project

Data collection and analysis partner in India and Bangladesh

Target 8.7 of the Sustainable Development Goals calls for effective measures to end forced labour, modern slavery and human trafficking, as well as child labour in all its forms. Itad is supporting the Global Fund to End Modern Slavery in achieving its mission in India and Bangladesh.

2/07/2020

For years, a lack of reliable evidence on what works to mitigate modern slavery has hampered the design of informed policies and programmes to tackle the issue. Modern slavery is complex and often results from multiple intersectional drivers, meaning evidence is often the best way of identifying and understanding the systemic, individual and environmental factors that contribute to its prevalence,  especially when it comes to critical blind spots.

The GFEMS (Global Fund to End Modern Slavery) is a transformational multi-donor fund forging public-private partnerships and catalysing a coherent global strategy to end modern slavery. Through a circa 15 million USD fund, GFEMS and UK’s DFID (Department for International Development) are sponsoring 14 projects to tackle modern slavery in India and Bangladesh under two broad funding themes: Sustaining Freedom and Business Engagement. The projects are targeting three sectors: overseas labour recruitment, commercial sex exploitation, and apparel.

Itad is a core consortium member supporting the evaluation and learning activities of these DFID-funded projects. Itad and Athena Infonomics are working in close collaboration with GFEMS and its grantees throughout the grant cycle to support innovation and systems-level analysis to test programme objectives.

Over the course of three years, this MEL support will be using a theory-based approach to test the projects’ ToC (Theory of Change) We will work with grantees to better understand the contexts their projects are operating in and identify the stakeholders they will need to engage.

 

Image: International Women’s Day march in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Credit: Soman